PAST PRESIDENTS
         
Sir Adye Douglas 1865 1905  
J. D  Johnston 1905 1907  
J   Lloyd 1907 1912  
C. K Ellis 1912 1913  
W. J MeElwee 1913 1916  
E. A Perkins 1916 1917  
W   Ferrall 1917 1918  
T Garrard 1918 1919  
W Ferrall 1919 1920  
T Garrard 1920 1921  
Hon. J. C Newton 1921 1925  
F Jackson 1925 1926  
Hon. J. C Newton 1926 1928  
Rev. George Rowe B.A 1928 1933  
M Joseph 1934 1943  
Gordon Scott 1944 1948  
A. J Cobern 1949 1950  
P. F Turner 1950 1954  
M. T  Bracy 1954 1965  
J. P Galna 1965 1967  
L MacLaren 1967 1969  
C. G Bushby 1969 1972  
P   Russell 1972 1976  
J Fitzgerald 1976 1978  
B Partridge 1978 1980  
Walker 1980 1983  
J Fitzgerald 1983 1986  
T Mace 1986 1992  
R Neil 1992 2011  
R Swain 2011  2014  
B Lockley 2014     

 

 

On Thursday evening (18 May 1865), a meeting of members of the Working Man's Club was held in Trinity School-room. His Worship the Mayor presided. The Club had then 230 enrolled members, and most of them were present. The rules prepared by the provisional committee were unanimously adopted. His Worship the Mayor (Adye Douglas, Esq.) was elected President.

Sir Adye Douglas (1815-1906), lawyer and politician was born on 31 May 1815 at Thorpe-next-Norwich, England. He sailed from London in the Louisa Campbell and arrived at Launceston in January 1839. After being admitted to practice in the Supreme Court, in 1842 he founded a legal firm that continues to operate today. Elected as one of the first aldermen in the Launceston Municipal Council he served as mayor in 1865-66 and 1880-82. He was also elected to represent Launceston in the first House of Assembly in 1856 and later served as Premier of Tasmania from 1884 until 1886 where he resigned and became Agent-General in London.

He represented Tasmania at the Sydney convention from which the Federal Council of Australasia was evolved. At its first session in Hobart, Douglas predicted a 'United States of Australasia, independent of the lieelt island in the Northern Hemisphere'. Called to oreder, he reminded members of the toasts of forty years ago to the 'Australian Republic'.